Events

Quilt Show

8th Annual Quilt Show & Challenge

July 20 – 21, 2012

 

The quaint and beautiful river town of Muncy, Pennsylvania is the setting for this annual Quilt Show.

The Muncy Show features 19th and 20th century quilts along with traditional and new quilts, representing virtually all styles. Diversity and artistic interpretation are highlights of the show and each year, the event is a showcase of stunning hand and machine workmanship, appliqué and quilting techniques, reflecting the originality of the makers and their expertise with needle and thread. The antique and vintage quilts, which help to set this Show apart from others, are from private and museum collections from across the state of Pennsylvania.

The Show also includes quilts entered in the Challenge Theme category, special exhibits, lectures and/or workshops, fabric and specialty vendors, quilt appraisals and a variety of hands-on demonstrations. The show activities are selected to appeal to all ages and young people are encouraged to participate.

We are delighted to be featuring a pristine collection of 19th Century PA pieced and appliqué vintage quilts for this year’s special exhibit. This spectacular collection, which includes a wide variety of patterns and sensibilities, has never been shown at our Muncy Show and is on loan from a private collection.

The Show’s will be held at the Myers Elementary School, located at 125 New Street, Muncy, PA, an air-conditioned facility with plenty of parking and easy accessibility from I-180.

***AIR CONDITIONED FACILITY***

Myers Elementary School, 125 New Street, Muncy, PA

 

From the South:I-180, exit 10 Main Street; left on Susquehanna Trail Rd/S. Main Street .9 mile; right on New Street .2 mile to school entrance on left

From the north: I-180, exit 13A; right on Route 405W .8 mile; left on S. Main Street .6 mile; left on New Street .2 mile to school entrance on left

Friday, July 20, 2012 & Saturday, July 21, 2012
Fri., 4 to 9 PM; Sat. 10 AM to 4 PM

Workshop – Saturday, July 21

Workshop: Muncy Historical Society’s Historic Quilt Patterns

 

Date & Time:             Saturday, July 21, 2012   10 a.m. to 1 p.m.       

Workshop Cost:           $20, includes your choice of MHS pattern & salad luncheon

Facilitators:                 Sheridan Walter & Judith Youngman

Location:                     Fellowship Hall, 1st United Methodist Church, 602 S. Market Street, Muncy

 

We are delighted to host our educational and hands-on workshop in conjunction with this year’s 8th Annual Quilt Show (July 20-21). As always, class size is limited so don’t delay in completing the enrollment information at the bottom of this announcement.

For this workshop, Sherry and Judith reintroduce the Muncy Historical Society’s series of historic quilt patterns. Come and plan your own vintage friendship quilt featuring either the Muncy Compass (1855) or Muncy Baskets (1880) pattern.

You may plan to replicate the original quilt or use it as an inspiration for your own family treasure

Bring your imagination, basic sewing supplies, and as much fabric as you cannot stand to leave at home! Machines not required, but are welcome, as you wish.

We hope that you will join us. If you have any questions, please give us a call (570) 546-5917 (Museum) or (570) 546-5502 (home) or send along an email MuncyHistorical@aol.com.

 

Click here to read more about the upcoming
2012 Quilt Show Challenges >>>

Click here for the >>>
MUNCY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
QUILT SHOW VENDOR  FORM

Click here for the >>>
MUNCY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
QUILT SHOW ENTRY FORM

Quilt Entry Deadline

(Antique, vintage, traditional, challenge)

Wednesday, July 18, 2012, noon

Muncy Historical Society hosts its Annual Quilt Show in July. Enjoy antique, traditional and art quilts at this year’s special 2-day Quilt Show.

2012 Dates: July 20, 4 – 9 p.m.

July 21, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Quilt Entry Deadline: Wednesday, July 18, noon

 

8th Annual Quilt Challenge – 2012

Quilt Entry Deadline: Wednesday, July 18, noon

For 2012, the Challenge is to create a quilt that is a new entry using any one of the past five years’ Challenge themes. Challenge entries must be accompanied by a picture of the replicated quilt and/or an explanation of the inspiration.

 

For easy reference, the Challenge themes were:

2007 Theme: “Americana/Glory Be” – quilt must include an eagle design (although not a replica of the MHS’s “Eagle Quilt” and the judges must recognize your interpretation of this excerpt from the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution: “We the people of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty…”

2008 Theme: “Americans Embrace Diversity” – a derivative of E Pluribus Unum to reflect diversity (out of many, one; one from many; immigrant influence; melting pot; heritage; cultural, legacy, ethnicity, customs, roots, traditions, pedigree, etc.) – the diversity of each scrap used in quilt must not be lost in interpretation of theme.

2009 Theme:  “Dreams Become Reality” – a quilt that reflects the voice of the quilter’s creativity; to let “their play become their reality”; entries must include a legend which describes the quilter’s reality by using pattern, color, craftsmanship, imagination and strong symbolic composition.

2010 Theme: “Coverlet-Inspired”: a quilt that translates a coverlet design(s) – interpret an overshot, a doublecloth or a jacquard coverlet or let your imagination soar; no color or technique restrictions.

2011 Theme: “Civil War-Inspired”: faithful to the sensibilities of the Civil War period in color, design, materials and quilting pattern; entry may be a replication of an actual Civil War quilt (provide a citation) or the product of your own imagination..

 

Size: Maximum 72” x 72” and Minimum 36” x 36”; Quilt may be any shape as long as the outside dimensions fall within these guidelines.

More about the 2012 Show

Judging: A three-person panel will judge quilt entries before the show opens. Judges reserve the right to change a quilt’s category when another category seems more appropriate. Judges will examine all entries and base their opinions on content and design, message to the viewer, and workmanship. (Workmanship is not 100 percent of the judging criteria)

 

For the 2012 Show, the judges will evaluate all quilts against the following categories:

  • One winner only in each of the following categories:
    • Best of Show (selected from all first-place winners)
    • Viewer’s Choice; and
    • Best Original Design

 

  • 1st, 2nd, & 3rdplace winners in each of the following categories:
    • Challenge;
    • Appliquéd;
    • Other Techniques;
    • Use of Color-Traditional;
    • Use of Color-Contemporary;
    • Hand-Quilting;
    • Domestic/Hand-Guided Machine-Quilting;
    • Computer-Guided Machine-Quilting;
    • Wall-Hanging; and
    • Under 16

 

“Use of Color” and “Machine Quilting” categories have been expanded to differentiate between Color-Traditional and Contemporary and Domestic/Hand-Guided and Computer-Guided Machine Quilting.

In 2012, Best of Show, Viewer’s Choice and the 1st place Challenge Quilt winners will receive an original watercolor by Robert Olmstead and a free quilt entry appraisal.

More about the Show …

Voting for Viewer’s Choice will be open until noon on Saturday with the Viewer’s Choice ribbon displayed on the winning quilt for the balance of the show.

 

Registration: All quilts must be registered by completing the quilt entry form. Quilt entry forms are available online or by calling the Society. Check in for all quilts, including Challenge Quilts, must be by Wednesday noon of show week. If it is not possible to hand deliver an entry, it may be mailed directly to the Muncy Historical Society, P.O. Box 11, 40 N. Main Street, Muncy, PA 17756.

 

All quilts should include a cloth label with the name of the quilt, the owner’s name and address sewn to the back of the entry. A 4-4 ½” hanging sleeve must be affixed to all traditional/contemporary entries.

 

Pick-up: Saturday at 4 p.m. or Monday following the show between 9 a.m. and 3

p.m. unless other arrangements are made. All entries must remain for the entire length of the show.

 

Questions: Call the Muncy Historical Society at 570.546.5917, write to Muncy Historical Society, P.O. Box 11, Muncy, PA 17756, or e-mail at MuncyHistorical@aol.com.

Click here to read more about the upcoming
2012 Quilt Show Challenge >>>

ANNOUNCING OUR 9TH ANNUAL QUILT CHALLENGE – 2013

9th Annual Quilt Challenge – 2013

Quilt Entry Deadline: Wednesday, July 17, noon

For 2013, the Challenge is to produce a quilt that has been inspired by, and reflects the work of, an artist working in another medium.

 

Consider the much-loved music of Bach, George Gershwin or the Beatles!

 

Could you interpret the color or design of Monet or Mondrian?

 

Perhaps an author such as A. A. Milne  or Louisa May Alcott will spark an image!

 

Think beyond your own culture or time…

 

Your quilt entry in the challenge must be accompanied by documentation of its inspiration.

Size: Maximum 72” x 72” and Minimum 36” x 36”; Quilt may be any shape as long as the outside dimensions fall within these guidelines.

 

 

Past Show’s Challenge Winners

2007 “Americana/Glory Be”:

Sheridan Walter, Mifflinburg, challenge winner with “For All People.” The quilt gently reminds all that the blessings named in the Preamble are fundamental human rights, not the exclusive property of Americans. Quilted olive branches invite the viewer to consider images of Americana from a global perspective. In this inclusive context, the eagle is symbolic of historical American expressions of human rights. Patriotic images, pieced into stars in a wide border with subtle value contrasts, appear to be a single fabric. This intentionally chosen effect avoids a flashy, flag-waving jingoism. Yet, close inspection will reveal that the glory of Americana is present. The patriotism is quiet, respectful and not boastful.

 

2008 “Americans Embrace Diversity”:

Carol Nihart Odell, Muncy, challenge winner with “Reaching for the Stars.” Odell used Minnesota’s state colors of maroon and gold in the quilt and the state’s motto, “The North Star State” supported the quilt’s theme. When the Midwest began looking for “strong, able-bodied young men” Odell’s grandparents left their Central Pennsylvania lifestyle to pursue a better life in logging and farming in Minnesota. Minnesota became Odell’s home until she met her husband, Fred Odell, and together they returned to Pennsylvania where they “reached for the stars” and reared their own family.

 

2009 “Dreams Become Reality”:

Betty Neff, Canton, challenge winner with “Tales of My Father’s Father.”  This is a story quilt, a genealogy quilt for Wyatt E. Neff by his paternal grandmother. The structure of this quilt is based on several paintings by Bruce Storm.

 

2010 “Coverlet-Inspired”:

Jane Coleman, Bruch Valley, PA, challenge winner with “4-Corners Inspired.” Sigrid Piroch of Foxburg, PA found a weaver’s pattern book printed in the 1820’s among her family possessions. She wanted these patterns reproduced in quilts. Jane chose this pattern. In the process of planning the quilt, the pattern fell on the floor. Looking at the design from a distance of 4 ½ feet, she saw the design similar to the ones used in Native American blankets or carpets. So she chose the southwest color palette and the quilting designs are similar to their pottery and basket weaving designs.

 

2011 “Civil War Era-Inspired”:

Lana Miller, Northumberland, PA, challenge winner with “A Tribute to Jane Stickle.”

Jane A. Stickle (1817-1896) made a quilt “In War Time-1863” that has since been named “Dear Jane”. As she was stitching she probably thought a lot about the soldiers in battle during the Civil War. We will probably never know her feelings at that time but the fact that she had those three words “In War Time” on her quilt speaks volumes. In 2009, during a trip to the Bennington Museum in Vermont, Lana spent a lot of time gazing at the “Dear Jane” quilt, imagining how Jane designed the blocks and wishing someday to make a few. In 2010, Lana’s group was given 20 paper pieced blocks and from there she drafted the remaining 101 needed for the 11 x 11 block quilt. Her reference source was the book of the same name, Dear Jane, by Brenda Papadakis. Many times she wondered how Jane had drafted each block and what she was thinking while she sewed. Like Jane, Lana’s thoughts were on a war and the failing health of her father, who passed away after the blocks were done but before the blocks were sewn into a quilt top.

 

2011 Quilt Show Winners

Best in Show

Lana Miller, Northumberland, “A Tribute to Jane Stickle’

 

Challenge Quilts

 

Lana Miller, Northumberland, “A Tribute to Jane Stickle

Sheridan G. Walter, Mifflinburg, “Winning A War Does Not A Union Make”

Sue Snyder, Hughesville, “Stars & Strife”

Viewer’s Choice

Sheridan G. Walter, Mifflinburg, “Winning A War Does Not A Union Make”

Best Original Design

Sue Snyder, Hughesville, “Overrun in PA”

 

Use of Color

Rhonda Adams Freezer, Hughesville, “Bargello Cosmic Twist”

Sheridan G. Walter, Mifflinburg, “Winning A War Does Not A Union Make”

Karen Trifonoff, Bloomsburg, “Concord Constellation”

Hand Quilting

Judith Cole Youngman, Northumberland, “Lest We Forget”

Iva McCoy, Muncy, “Apple Blossom”

Frances Spring, Muncy, “Log Cabin Star”

Machine Quilting

Judith Cole Youngman, Northumberland, “Hospitality”

Rhonda Adams Freezer, Hughesville, “Pittsburg Steelers”

Karen Trifonoff, Bloomsburg, “Baskets”

Wall Hanging

Judith Cole Youngman, Northumberland, “Hospitality”

Karen Trifonoff, Bloomsburg, “Baskets”

Lana Miller, Northumberland, “My Basket Overflows II”

Appliqué

Lana Miller, Northumberland, “A Tribute to Jane Stickle

Sue Snyder, Hughesville, “Overrun in PA”

Sue Snyder, Hughesville, “Shoefly Spring”

Other Techniques

Brenda Myers, Hughesville, “Through the Kitchen Window”

Mary Fisher, Williamsport, “Over the River ad Through the Woods”

Frances Spring, Muncy, “Pin Wheel”

Under 16

Kelly Showers, Allenwood, “Pounded Flowers”

More About The 2012 Challenge Entries

 

To commemorate the Civil War’s sesquicentennial the 2011 challenge theme is “The Civil War Quilt.”

The young men of the Susquehanna Valley and state of Pennsylvania responded to their nation’s call and many paid the ultimate sacrifice. In Muncy alone, more than 120 of our promising sons met their fate on the battlefield or died as a result of disease attributable to their exposure to Southern climes or imprisonment. To honor those who lost their lives and those who returned from war with lifelong impairments, the theme for 2011 is “The Civil War Quilt.”    The Muncy area also was a destination for fugitive slaves both before and during the war, which makes the story of emancipation also relevant for quilt consideration.

Challenge entries had to be faithful to the sensibilities of the period in color, design, materials and quilting pattern. Entries could be a replication of an actual Civil War quilt (if so, with provided citation) or the product of the quilter’s own imagination as long as the stated criteria were met.

 

 

“A Tribute to Jane Stickle”

Appliquéd, pieced, hand-quilted and owned by Lana Miller

(Patterns used from Dear Jane book but drafted 101 of the blocks);

Quilted by Anna Ruth Stoltzfus

BEST OF SHOW, 1ST PLACE CHALLENGE, & BEST APPLIQUE AWARDS

Jane A. Stickle (1817-1896) made a quilt “In War Time-1863” that has since been named “Dear Jane”. As she was stitching she probably thought a lot about the soldiers in battle during the Civil War. We will probably never know her feelings at that time but the fact that she had those three words “In War Time” on her quilt speaks volumes.

In 2009, during a trip to the Bennington Museum in Vermont, Lana spent a lot of time gazing at the “Dear Jane” quilt, imagining how Jane designed the blocks and wishing someday to make a few.

In 2010, her group was given 20 paper pieced blocks and from there she drafted the remaining 101 needed for the 11 x 11 block quilt. Her reference source was the book of the same name, Dear Jane, by Brenda Papadakis.

Many times Lana wondered how Jane had drafted each block and what she was thinking while she sewed. Like Jane, her thoughts were on a war and the failing health of her father, who passed away after the blocks were done but before the blocks were sewn into a quilt top.

“Winning A War Does Not A Union Make”

Pieced, hand quilted by Sheridan Goddard Walter

2ND PLACE CHALLENGE, VIEWER’S CHOICE, & 2ND PLACE USE OF COLOR AWARDS

 

The story of the American Civil War is presented symbolically in this quilt. Individual blocks were chosen for their implied meaning and visual effect.

Five “Wild Goose Chase” blocks in the center are symbols of a country at crossroads. The Union was at risk, threatened fundamentally by the moral issues of slavery and racial bias.

Small “Log Cabin” blocks represent a “house divided,” father against son, brother against brother. In almost military fashion, they form a line around the central square and suggest the Mason-Dixon Line that became the symbolic divider between the North and South.

In this “Churn Dash Variation,”* small white rectangles in fields of black, arranged with precision and dignity, represent grave markers of fallen soldiers, northern and southern, young and old, known and unknown.

Four “House” blocks in the corners represent the journey home for those who survived the war-time atrocities and who began the slow process of rebuilding what had been lost in the war.

Twenty-four “Union Star” blocks symbolize American hopes for the future, not trophies for suppressing secession.

Always more than just a battle cry, always more than military defeats, the Union must be built, affirmed, and reaffirmed in every generation. The American Union is only as strong as the moral fiber of its citizens and the moral cohesion of its principles, because racial bias is incompatible with the Bill of Rights, the American Union remains challenged wherever issues of racial bias emerge.

*The Standard Book of Quilt Making & Collecting, Marguerite Ickis, p. 230.

Prairie Children & Their Quilts, Kathleen Tracy, p. 31.

 

Stars and Strife

Appliquéd, pieced and owned by Sue Snyder;

Quilted by Brenda Myers

3RD PLACE CHALLENGE AWARD

 

The inspiration for this quilt came from Brenda’s large collection of very small pieces of

Reproduction fabrics. She combined ideas from several of Judy Rothermel’s Civil War reproduction quilts to design this quilt.

 

 

“Lest We Forget”

In this, the Sesquicentennial year of the Civil War

Pieced, hand-quilted and owned by Judith Cole Youngman

BEST HAND QUILTING AWARD

“Lest We Forget” was inspired by Muncy Historical Society’s observation of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War.

It was incredible to Judith that such a small town as Muncy lost 137 of its sons to disease or battle from 1861-1865, and she was moved to honor the lives of some in this vintage mourning quilt.

Somber in sensibility, it features an un-named star block from (1859), “reproduction” fabrics of the period, appropriate setting and a simple elbow quilting pattern. The backing fabric commemorates the life of another Civil War heroine, Clara Barton.

 

CIVIL WAR COT QUILT

Pieced and owned by Abigail Appleman Schrack;

Machine-quilted by Larry Rhinehart

During the Civil War, women supported the soldiers from the homefront. As part of the U. S. Sanitary Commission women recycled fabric scraps to create cot quilts for wounded soldiers. Today very few of these quilts still exist since they were so well-used.

This cot quilt is based on the Railroad Crossing pattern found in the Civil War Sewing Circle by Kathleen Tracy. Abby used reproduction dressing gown prints to patch together the quilt just as the women of the Civil War era would have.

After the show, this quilt is a gift for one of Abby’s dear friends who served with the Army National Guard in the conflict in Iraq.

 

PVT. WILLIAM MARGRAFF’S CIVIL WAR LETTERS

Concept pieced and owned by Kay Rhinehart;

Machine-quilted by Larry Rhinehart

A number of years ago Kay came across the book – A Civil War Soldier’s Last Letters written by Pvt. William Margraff and compiled by Paul Janeski. Pvt. Margraff was originally from Germany but emigrated to the U.S. and lived in Wellsboro, PA. He wrote letters home to his family from May, 1861 until September, 1862. Pvt. Margraff was killed at Antietam on September 17, 1862. One of the interesting parts of this story is how the letters were found. Paul Janeski of Wellsboro found them in the summer of 1969 at the town dump while taking his trash there.

“The letters were neatly folded in an old tin box with a lock and key. I picked up the box and threw it back down again, then decided to see what was in it. I opened the box and saw the letters. They didn’t interest me at first, but I decided to take them home and maybe some day look them over. Several months passed before I ever opened the box again.”

When Mr. Janeski finally read them, he realized what a treasure he had stumbled across. He decided to put the letters into book form. He especially thought it was interesting to see the war through the eyes of an Army private.

Private Margraff is buried in the family plot in the Wellsboro Cemetery.

This book has always intrigued Kay especially how the letters were found. When this challenge was announced, Kay thought there might be a way to use the letters, so she put short sentences from his letters into the star quilt squares. His picture is in the middle of the quilt. Other quilt squares used are from the Civil War timeframe. Fabric used is Civil War reproduction quilting material. Permission was received from Mr. Janeski’s daughter to use parts of the letters in the quilt (Mr. Janeski has died).

“Journey Through Time”

Quilted by The Messiah Wannabees

According to Underground Railroad “legend,” quilts contained codes to assist fugitive slaves in their pursuit to freedom more than 150 years ago. This is a tied/knotted entry in which the knots represent the distance between safe houses on the Underground Railroad. Quilt code patterns included on this entry are: Monkey Wrench (collect tools for journey; turns to wagon wheel); Wagon Wheel; Bear Paw (follow bear tracks through mountain trails); Crossroads (travel to Cleveland, main crossroad to Canada); Log Cabin (black center, or yellow, signified a safe home for fugitives); Shoofly (free slave who aided fugitives); Bowtie, or Hourglass (dress up to disguise self); Flying Geese (point north, south, east or west); Drunkards Path (follow zigzag path to avoid capture); Tumbling Blocks (time to escape); Jacobs Ladder (symbol for the Underground Railroad); and North Star (follow to North Star to freedom).

 

 

“Scraps”

Pieced, machine-quilted and owned by Brenda L. Myers

Inspired by a pattern found in American Patchwork Quilting entitled “Old Maid’s Patience” circa 1860s.

 

 

 

Quilt Show Supporting Vendors


Rose of Sharon QS
311 Mill Street
Danville, PA 17821
570-275-1005
Our Gathering Place
936 Plaza Drive
Montoursville, PA 17754
570-368-1130
www.ogpquiltshop.com
Valeria & Fred Hill
RR 3 Box 25
Wyalusing, PA 18853
570-746-3304
Patches and PatchworkJane Sterry216 Main StreetPortland, CT 06480860-543-0404Timberline PatchworkDelmas & Ruth Witmer160 Mountain Rd.

Denver, PA 17517

717-669-5619

Elena Rosa
35-50 85th Street, Suite 1D
Jackson Heights, NY 11372917-517-9767

 

2010 Quilt Show Winners

Best in Show

Judith Youngman, Northumberland, “Wm Penn Courthouse Steps”

Challenge Quilt

Jane Coleman, Brush Valley, “4-Corners Influenced”

Sue Snyder, Hughesville, “Pace of Nature”

Francie Appleman, Turbotville, “Snow Hill Baby Quilt”

Viewer’s Choice

Linda Poulton, Muncy, owner; Hand Quilted by Clarkstown’s Messiah Lutheran Wednesday Quilters, “Twisting Star”

Under 16 – New in 2010

Tiffany Waughen, Montgomery

Best Original Design – New in 2010

Brenda L. Myers, Hughesville, “Dreaming of Spring”

Brenda L. Myers. “Enoch Eagle Family Tree”

Best Use of Color – New in 2010

Judith Youngman, “Wm Penn Courthouse Steps”

Judith Youngman, “Muncy Compass Revisited”

Wall Hanging

Sue Snyder, “Eagle Crossing”

Judith Youngman, “Muncy Compass Mini”

Sue Snyder, “Bittersweet Stars”

Hand Quilting

Lana Miller, Northumberland, “Pine Burr”

Judith Youngman, “Muncy Compass, Replicated”

Betty Fisher/Whipple, Muncy, “From the Heart”

Machine Quilting

Rhonda Adams-Freezer, Hughesville, “Log Cabin”

Karen Trifonoff, Bloomsburg, “Gathering Baskets”

Nancy Bobst, Cogan Station, “Gatherers Stars”

Appliqué

Frances Spring, Muncy, “Ohio Daisy”

Francis Spring, “American Beauty”

Unknown quilter, “Heart & Leaf Motif”

Embroidery

Betty Fisher/Whipple, “From the Heart”

Mary Fischer, Williamsport, “Winter Wonderland”

Edna Peachy, Lewisburg, “Edna’s Hearts”

2009 Quilt Show Winners

Best of Show
Judith Youngman, Northumberland

Challenge Winner
Betty Neff, Canton
Sue Snyder, Hughesville
Jim Jensen, Santa Rosa, CA

Viewer’s Choice
Lana Miller, Northumberland

Hand Quilting
Sheridan Walter, Mifflinburg
Lana Miller, Northumberland
Janet Hurlbut, Chemung, NY

Machine Quilting
Judith Youngman, Northumberland
Judith Youngman, Northumberland
Annette Foresman, Williamsport

Appliqué
Judith Youngman, Northumberland
Sue Snyder, Hughesville
Betty Neff, Canton

Wall Hanging
Lana Miller, Northumberland
Lana Miller, Northumberland
Sheridan Walter, Mifflinburg

2008 Quilt Show Winners

Best of Show
George Shaffer, Northumberland

Challenge Winner
Carol Nihart Odell, Muncy

Viewer’s Choice
Blanche McCormick, Allenwood

Hand Quilting
George Shaffer

George Shaffer

Blanche McCormick


Machine Quilting

Nancy Ryder, Hughesville

Sue Peterson, Cogan Station

Nancy Ryder

Appliqué

George Shaffer

Bonita Whipple, Montoursville

 

Embroidery

Joyce Emigk, Montoursville

Fannie McKee, Muncy

Sue Keller, Pennsdale


Wall Hanging
Sheridan Walter, Mifflinburg

Barbara Brumbaugh, Williamsport

Mary Doyle, Muncy

 

2007 Quilt Show Winners

Best of Show
Sheridan Walter, Mifflinburg, “Ways to Center”

Challenge Winner
Sheridan Walter, “For All People”

Louise Schelter, Towanda, “Domestic Tranquility”

Sue Peterson, Cogan Station, “Not a Turkey Mr. Franklin”

 

Viewer’s Choice
Betty Thomas, Montgomery

Hand Quilting
Sheridan Walter, “Ways to Center”

George Shaffer, Northumberland

Carol Odell, Muncy


Machine Quilting

Nola Baysore, Muncy, “Angel of Peace”

Nola Baysore, “Pinwheels”

Laura Lee Ruckle, Millmont, “Bows and Bouquet”

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